ePlasty: Vol. 8
Addition of Epidermal Growth Factor Improves the Rate of Sulfur Mustard Wound Healing in an In Vitro Model
Claudia L. Henemyre-Harris, PhD,a Angela L. Adkins, LATg certified,a Augustine H. Chuang, PhD,b and John S. Graham, PhDc

aPhysiology and Immunology Branch, Research Division, US Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD; bDepartment of Clinical Investigation, Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center, Fort Gordon, GA; and cMedical Toxicology Branch, Analytical Toxicology Division, US Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD

Correspondence: claudia.henemyre@us.army.mil

Disclaimer: The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the US Army or the Department of Defense.

Objective: Sulfur mustard (SM) causes blisters on the human skin. These blisters delay healing of the skin and make the victims more susceptible to infection. In vitro models have been used for protection studies against SM injury, but study on wound healing after SM exposure has not been explored. The purpose of this study was to test whether the addition of exogenous growth factors could improve the rate of SM wound healing. Methods: The model consisted of normal human epidermal keratinocytes seeded into 6-well plates, exposed to SM, and wounded (disruption of the cell monolayer) with a sterile w .......